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Joshua Moore
Joshua Moore

Where To Buy Banish Herbicide


The low odor herbicide Banish is a non-selective water-based concentrate that destroys the plant from the roots up, and features year-long residual weed control. The versatile Banish total kill concentrated formula can be used at a 10 to 1 dilution to eliminate hard-to-kill annual and perennial weeds, and can also be diluted 2 to 1 and used for special jobs such as brush removal.




where to buy banish herbicide



For use in areas where you would want all vegetation killed: non cropland areas, railroad rights-of-way, fence rows, around buildings, loading ramps, storage yards, industrial sites, parking lots, tank farms and more.


Banish is a water-based, non-selective, total kill herbicide with residual control. It is strong enough to eliminate hard-to-kill weeds, and can be used for customized jobs. By going to work to destroy the plant from the roots up, Banish provides long-term, full-season root kill.


The last resort for many property owners, herbicides are a toxic (and environmentally unfriendly), yet effective way to remove weeds from your lawn. Available at your local garden supply store or nursery, herbicides should be applied with care, as instructed on the packaging. Most often available in liquid form, herbicides can be applied using a garden hose. Take great care to ensure that you buy herbicides that are meant to kill weeds without harming the grass, too. Finally, be sure to keep small children and pets off your lawn until the product dries.


Dithiopyr is used as a pre-emergence and early post-emergence herbicide for selective control of crabgrass and other susceptible annual grasses. It is also used to curtail broadleaf weeds in established lawns and ornamental turf. Data indicates that dithiopyr is highly toxic to freshwater fish and aquatic invertebrates but is practically non-toxic to birds. Dithiopyr does not significantly degrade with exposure to sunlight. The half-life on soil at the surface is over one year. Dithiopyr binds fairly strongly to soil and has low solubility in water. This suggests that dithiopyr has a low potential for leaching into ground water. Surface water contamination may be an issue. The reporting limit for dithiopyr is 0.010 mg/kg in soil and 0.10 µg/L in water.


Aminopyralid is a new selective herbicide produced by Dow AgroSciences. It is used for broad leaf weed control. It is currently marketed under the trade names: Banish herbicide, Milestone herbicide, and ForeFront herbicide. Mammalian toxicity is low for ingestion, contact, and inhalation but it is capable of causing severe eye irritation and corneal injury. Aminopyralid is not readily biodegradable. Field studies have shown aminopyralid is likely to be non-persistent and relatively immobile. It is not very toxic to birds, bees, earthworms and aquatic invertebrates. It is slightly toxic to aquatic organisms on an acute basis. No drinking water limits have been established by EPA at this time. There is evidence that manure from animals that have consumed feed containing aminopyralid retains the herbicidal activity. This is being carefully examined in the U.K. at present. The reporting limit for aminopyralid is 2.0 ng/g (ppb) in soil.


Endothall is a terrestrial and aquatic herbicide and defoliant. It is marketed under the trade names: Accelerate, Aquathol, Des-i-cate, Herbicide 273, Hydrothol, Hebron Pennout, and Hydout. In 1982 1.5 million pounds was released into the environment. Potential health effects: Short term; depressed breathing and heart rates; long term; increase in size of some internal organs especially stomach and intestine. The MCL (maximum contaminate level) for endothall in drinking water is 100 ppb. The long term MCL is the same. Endothall is very water soluble and is capable of migrating through the soil column and into ground water quickly. This tendency is mitigated by the fact that under aerobic conditions Endothall is quickly broken down by microbial activity. Limits of quantitation are in the range of 50 ng/g (ppb) dependent on the matrix.


Greg Jordan comes to NCL from Columbia Analytical Laboratory in Jacksonville, Florida where he managed the laboratory for seven years. He successfully oversaw the development of the Jacksonville lab into an efficient and solidly profitable organization. Greg has a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Southern California and has 30 years of experience in the environmental laboratory industry. He began his career as a bench chemist and moved to supervisory positions and ultimately to Laboratory Manager. NCL looks forward to working with Greg to develop the laboratory in ways that will meet the future demands of the environmental community.


Aminopyralid is a new selective herbicide produced by Dow AgroSciences. It is used for broad leaf weed control. It is currently marketed under the trade names: Banish herbicide, Milestone herbicide, and ForeFront herbicide. Mammalian toxicity is low for ingestion, contact, and inhalation but it is capable of causing severe eye irritation and corneal injury. Aminopyralid is not readily biodegradable. Field studies have shown aminopyralid is likely to be non-persistent and relatively immobile. It is not very toxic to birds, bees, earthworms and aquatic invertebrates. It is slightly toxic to aquatic organisms on an acute basis. No drinking water limits have been established by EPA at this time. There is evidence that manure from animals that have consumed feed containing aminopyralid retains the herbicidal activity. This is being carefully examined in the U.K. at present. The reporting limit for aminopyralid is 0.10 ppb in water.


Aminopyralid is a selective herbicide used for control of broadleaf weeds, especially thistles and clovers. It is in the picolinic acid family of herbicides, which also includes clopyralid, picloram, triclopyr, and several less common herbicides.[2][3] It was first registered for use in 2005, in the USA under the brand name "Milestone"[4] and later under various names starting with "Grazon".[5] In the UK it is sold under the brand names Banish, Forefront, Halcyon, Pharaoh, Pro-Banish, Runway, Synero, and Upfront.


Aminopyralid is of concern to vegetable growers, as it can enter the food chain via manure, which contains long-lasting residues of the herbicide. It affects potatoes, tomatoes, and beans, causing deformed plants, and poor or non-existent yields. Problems with manure contaminated with aminopyralid residue surfaced in the UK in June and July 2008, and, at the end of July 2008, Dow AgroSciences implemented an immediate suspension of UK sales and use of herbicides containing aminopyralid.[6]


Despite restrictions, symptoms of aminopyralid damage were recorded on crops growing in allotments in Edinburgh, UK as recently as June 2010; enquiries traced the source of contamination to a farm supplying hay to the stables from where bags of manure had been obtained. Symptoms of aminopyralid injury to vegetable crops were reported by small farmers and gardeners in Britain in July 2011.[9]


1) Some active ingredients in total kill herbicides like bromacil, Prometon, different variations of glyphosate to name a few, will work in different areas better than others. The reason for that is weeds will get resistant to these ingredients over time much like bacteria and antibiotics in the human body.


So then your choice is a simple one. Choose a total kill herbicide that can be used in your state (listed in the product description). Then also choose one that you think will work and kill all the weeds in your area.


When spring rolls around every year and the growing season starts I get the usual questions from people that need to kill and control weeds. And the reasons why vary depending on the individual and where they live. A lot of times people will need to control weed growth because of local government ordinances or to keep desirable land looking neat and clean. Not to mention times when an invasive weed species enters an area and needs to be addressed quickly to stop the spread and limit damage.


Naturally, people will want to get the best herbicide that kill everything or they might call it the best vegetation killer, ground sterilizer, total kill weed killer, soil sterilizer, ground sterilant, ground kill, or total kill.


This is called the residual effect. Basically when you apply this type of herbicides you need to saturate the soil. This is how the ground sterilant will enter the root zone and prevent further growth.


Banish is a water-based, non-selective, total kill herbicide with residual control. It is strong enough to eliminate hard-to-kill weeds, and can be used for special jobs. For use in areas where you would want a non-selective herbicide with year-long residual control: non cropland areas, railroad rights-of-way, fence rows, around buildings, loading ramps, storage yards, industrial sites, parking lots, tank farms and more.


Where hostile conditions exist for lawn grasses, you can spot treat for crabgrass with pre-emergence herbicides. These herbicides work on the seeds as they germinate. Because they are ineffective on ungerminated seeds or established plants, timing is critical.


The second product is Drive DF. It is a dry flowable product that you mix in water and spray before you seed an area. It works great in small seeded areas because you can spray it where you want to seed. You use only about 1/3 of an ounce per gallon of water. The best part: It is also a post-emergent crabgrass spray too. You can use it to spray existing crabgrass plants if some emerge anywhere else in your lawn. It also controls a few broadleaf weeds like clover too. It can be bought in Drive 1# containers for a little more than 100 dollars (professional s use cases of this size) . It can also be purchased in Drive 1.5 oz bottles for about 20 dollars. This size will make 5 gallons of crabgrass pre-emergent for seeded areas or crabgrass killer for mature crabgrass plants .


As mentioned above, once crabgrass emerges, you can apply postemergent herbicides, usually from early June through mid-July. Several different herbicides are on the market that can kill plants that have not yet tillered. Drive DF is a good one . Acclaim Extra is another good product. Acclaim Extra is only a post-emergent crabgrass control . It is a liquid you mix in water and spray on crabgrass. It comes in large size concentrate, but is also sold in Acclaim pint size containers. An average rate is about oz per 1000 sq ft or gallon of water. This will give you 16 gallons or 16,000 sq ft of crabgrass killer. 041b061a72


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